Receptors Related to Cell Activation

Cell activation including T cells, dendritic cells, B cells, granulocytes and NK cells, is an important process in innate and adaptive immune system. Receptors on the surface of these cells help complete whole cell activation process. For example, T cells scan the intracellular environment in order to target and destroy infected cells. Small peptide fragments, representing the entire cellular content, are transported to the cell surface as pMHCs, allowing T cell surface expressed antigen specific TCRs to scan for foreign signals. T cell receptor (TCR) binding to antigen-loaded MHC, both helper T cells and cytotoxic T cells require a number of secondary signals to become activated and respond to the threat.

In B cell activation, the receptor on the surface of B cell is called B cell antigen receptor (BCR). First of all, like the T cell receptor (TCR), B cell receptor (BCR) transmits signals directly to the cell's interior when it binds antigen. Then, the B cell receptor delivers the antigen to intracellular sites where it is degraded and returned to the B cell surface as peptides bound to MHC class II molecules. B cell proliferates and its progeny differentiates into antibody-secreting cells.

Sino biological offers a comprehensive set of tools for receptors related to cell activation research, including recombinant proteins, antibodies (mouse mAbs, rabbit mAbs, and rabbit pAbs), ELISA kits, and ORF cDNA clones.

Receptors Related to Cell Activation Expressed on T Cells

Receptors Related to Cell Activation Expressed on Dendritic Cells

Receptors Related to Cell Activation Expressed on B Cells

Receptors Related to Cell Activation Expressed on Granulocytes

Receptors Related to Cell Activation Expressed on NK Cells