Human TrkA HEK293 Overexpression Lysate

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Human TrkA HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Product Information

Product Description
This Human TrkA overexpression lysate was created in HEK293 Cells and intented for use as a Western blot (WB) positive control. Purification of TrkA protein (Cat: 11073-H08H) from the overexpression lysate was verified.
Expression Host
HEK293 Cells
Species
Human
Sequence Information
A DNA sequence encoding the human NTRK1 (NP_002520.2) extracellular domain (Met 1-Pro 382) was expressed with a C-terminal polyhistidine tag.
Molecule Mass
The recombinant human NTRK1 consists of 361 amino acids and has a predicted molecular mass of 39.5 kDa. As a result of glycosylation, it migrates as an approximately 60-65 kDa band in SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions.

Human TrkA HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Usage Guide

Preparation Method
Cell lysate was prepared by homogenization of the over-expressed cells in ice-cold modified RIPA Lysis Buffer with cocktail of protease inhibitors (Sigma). Cell debris was removed by centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined by Bradford assay (Bio-Rad protein assay, Microplate Standard assay). The cell lysate was boiled for 5 min in 1 x SDS loading buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl pH 6.8, 12.5% glycerol, 1% sodium dodecylsulfate, 0.01% bromophenol blue) containing 5% b-mercaptoethanol, and lyophilized.
Lysis Buffer
Modified RIPA Lysis Buffer: 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 1mM EDTA, 1% Triton X-100, 0.1% SDS, 1% Sodium deoxycholate, 1mM PMSF.
Recommend Usage
1.  Centrifuge the tube for a few seconds and ensure the pellet at the bottom of the tube. 2.  Re-dissolve the pellet using 200μL pure water and boil for 2-5 min.
Sample Buffer
1 X Sample Buffer (1 X modified RIPA buffer+1 X SDS loading buffer).
Stability & Storage
Store at 4℃ for up to twelve months from date of receipt. After re-dissolution, aliquot and store at -80℃ for up to twelve months. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
Application
Western Blot (WB)
Optimal dilutions/concentrations should be determined by the end user.

Human TrkA HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Alternative Names

Human MTC Overexpression Lysate; Human p140-TrkA Overexpression Lysate; Human TRK Overexpression Lysate; Human Trk-A Overexpression Lysate; Human TRK1 Overexpression Lysate; Human TRKA Overexpression Lysate

TrkA Background Information

TRKA is a member of the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor (NTKR) family. It is a membrane-bound receptor that, upon neurotrophin binding, phosphorylates itself and members of the MAPK pathway. Isoform TrkA-III promotes angiogenesis and has oncogenic activity when overexpressed. Isoform TrkA-I is found in most non-neuronal tissues. Isoform TrkA-II is primarily expressed in neuronal cells. TrkA-III is specifically expressed by pluripotent neural stem and neural crest progenitors. The presence of NTRK1 leads to cell differentiation and may play a role in specifying sensory neuron subtypes. Mutations in TRKA gene have been associated with congenital insensitivity to pain, anhidrosis, self-mutilating behavior, mental retardation and cancer. It was originally identified as an oncogene as it is commonly mutated in cancers, particularly colon and thyroid carcinomas. TRKA is required for high-affinity binding to nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 and neurotrophin-4/5 but not brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Known substrates for the Trk receptors are SHC1, PI 3-kinase, and PLC-gamma-1. NTRK1 has a crucial role in the development and function of the nociceptive reception system as well as establishment of thermal regulation via sweating. It also activates ERK1 by either SHC1- or PLC-gamma-1-dependent signaling pathway. Defects in NTRK1 are a cause of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis and thyroid papillary carcinoma.
Full Name
neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 1
References
  • Lambiase A, et al. (2005) Molecular basis for keratoconus: lack of TrkA expression and its transcriptional repression by Sp3. Natl Acad Sci. 102 (46):16795-800.
  • Benito-Gutiérrez E, et al. (2006) Origin and evolution of the Trk family of neurotrophic receptors. Mol Cell Neurosci. 31(2):179-92.
  • Martin-Zanca D, et al. (1986) A human oncogene formed by the fusion of truncated tropomyosin and protein tyrosine kinase sequences. Nature. 319(6056):743-8.
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