Human Leptin Receptor HEK293 Overexpression Lysate

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Human Leptin Receptor HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Product Information

Product Description
This Human Leptin Receptor overexpression lysate was created in HEK293 Cells and intented for use as a Western blot (WB) positive control. Purification of Leptin Receptor protein (Cat: 10322-H03H) from the overexpression lysate was verified.
Expression Host
HEK293 Cells
Species
Human
Sequence Information
A DNA sequence encoding the extracellular domain (Met 1-Asp 839) of human leptin receptor precursor (NP_002294.2) was expressed with the C-terminal fused polyhistidine-tagged Fc region of human IgG1.
Molecule Mass
The recombinant human LEPR/Fc is a disulfide-linked homodimeric protein.The reduced monomer consists of 1065 amino acids and has a predicted molecular mass of 121.4 kDa. In SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions, the apparent molecular mass of rh LEPR/Fc monomer is approximately 155-165 kDa due to glycosylation.

Human Leptin Receptor HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Usage Guide

Preparation Method
Cell lysate was prepared by homogenization of the over-expressed cells in ice-cold modified RIPA Lysis Buffer with cocktail of protease inhibitors (Sigma). Cell debris was removed by centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined by Bradford assay (Bio-Rad protein assay, Microplate Standard assay). The cell lysate was boiled for 5 min in 1 x SDS loading buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl pH 6.8, 12.5% glycerol, 1% sodium dodecylsulfate, 0.01% bromophenol blue) containing 5% b-mercaptoethanol, and lyophilized.
Lysis Buffer
Modified RIPA Lysis Buffer: 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 1mM EDTA, 1% Triton X-100, 0.1% SDS, 1% Sodium deoxycholate, 1mM PMSF.
Recommend Usage
1.  Centrifuge the tube for a few seconds and ensure the pellet at the bottom of the tube. 2.  Re-dissolve the pellet using 200μL pure water and boil for 2-5 min.
Sample Buffer
1 X Sample Buffer (1 X modified RIPA buffer+1 X SDS loading buffer).
Stability & Storage
Store at 4℃ for up to twelve months from date of receipt. After re-dissolution, aliquot and store at -80℃ for up to twelve months. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
Application
Western Blot (WB)
Optimal dilutions/concentrations should be determined by the end user.

Human Leptin Receptor HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Alternative Names

Human CD295 Overexpression Lysate; Human LEP-R Overexpression Lysate; Human LEPRD Overexpression Lysate; Human OB-R Overexpression Lysate; Human OBR Overexpression Lysate

Leptin Receptor Background Information

Leptin Receptor or CD295 belongs to the gp13 family of cytokine receptors that are known to stimulate gene transcription via activation of cytosolic STAT proteins. This protein is a receptor for leptin (an adipocyte-specific hormone that regulates body weight), and is involved in the regulation of fat metabolism, as well as in a novel hematopoietic pathway that is required for normal lymphopoiesis. Leptin Receptor/CD295 is a transmembrane catalytic receptors found on NPY/AgRP and alpha-MSH/CART neurons in hypothalamic nuclei. Leptin receptors (Ob-Rs) are coded for by one human gene that produces six different isoforms; Ob-Ra - Ob-Rf. Ob-Rs exist as constitutive dimers at physiological expression levels. Only the Ob-Rb isoform can transduce intracellular signals and does so through activation of the JAK2/STAT3, PI 3-K and MAPK signaling cascades. Activation of Ob-Rs mediates transcriptional regulation of the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway and downregulates endocannabinoid expression. Leptin acts via leptin receptors. Leptin resistance has been proposed as a pathophysiological mechanism of obesity. In obese individuals, Ob-Ra (which is involved in active transport of leptin across the blood-brain barrier) expression is downregulated and the individual may be unresponsive to leptin signals. Ob-R antagonists are of great interest in the development of pharmacological treatments for obesity. Mutations in Leptin Receptor/CD295 have been associated with obesity and pituitary dysfunction.
Full Name
leptin receptor
References
  • Heshka JT, et al. (2001) A role for dietary fat in leptin receptor, OB-Rb, function. Life Sci. 69 (9): 987-1003.
  • Chen H, et al (1996) Evidence that the diabetes gene encodes the leptin receptor: identification of a mutation in the leptin receptor gene in db/db mice. Cell. 84 (3): 491-5.
  • Bjrbaek C, et al. (1998) Divergent signaling capacities of the long and short isoforms of the leptin receptor. J Biol Chem. 272 (51): 32686-95.
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