Human Fas/CD95 HEK293 Overexpression Lysate

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Human Fas/CD95 HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Product Information

Product Description
This Human Fas/CD95 overexpression lysate was created in HEK293 Cells and intented for use as a Western blot (WB) positive control. Purification of Fas/CD95 protein (Cat: 10217-H08H) from the overexpression lysate was verified.
Expression Host
HEK293 Cells
Species
Human
Sequence Information
A DNA sequence encoding the extracellular domain (Met 1-Asn 173) of human FAS antigen (NP_000034.1) was expressed, with a C-terminal polyhistidine tag.
Molecule Mass
The secreted recombinant human FAS comprises 159 amino acids and has a predicted molecular mass of 18.2 kDa. In SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions, the apparent molecular mass of rhFAS is approximately 30-40 kDa due to glycosylation.

Human Fas/CD95 HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Usage Guide

Preparation Method
Cell lysate was prepared by homogenization of the over-expressed cells in ice-cold modified RIPA Lysis Buffer with cocktail of protease inhibitors (Sigma). Cell debris was removed by centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined by Bradford assay (Bio-Rad protein assay, Microplate Standard assay). The cell lysate was boiled for 5 min in 1 x SDS loading buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl pH 6.8, 12.5% glycerol, 1% sodium dodecylsulfate, 0.01% bromophenol blue) containing 5% b-mercaptoethanol, and lyophilized.
Lysis Buffer
Modified RIPA Lysis Buffer: 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 1mM EDTA, 1% Triton X-100, 0.1% SDS, 1% Sodium deoxycholate, 1mM PMSF.
Recommend Usage
1.  Centrifuge the tube for a few seconds and ensure the pellet at the bottom of the tube. 2.  Re-dissolve the pellet using 200μL pure water and boil for 2-5 min.
Sample Buffer
1 X Sample Buffer (1 X modified RIPA buffer+1 X SDS loading buffer).
Stability & Storage
Store at 4℃ for up to twelve months from date of receipt. After re-dissolution, aliquot and store at -80℃ for up to twelve months. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
Application
Western Blot (WB)
Optimal dilutions/concentrations should be determined by the end user.

Human Fas/CD95 HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Alternative Names

Human ALPS1A Overexpression Lysate; Human APO-1 Overexpression Lysate; Human APT1 Overexpression Lysate; Human CD95 Overexpression Lysate; Human FAS1 Overexpression Lysate; Human FASTM Overexpression Lysate; Human TNFRSF6 Overexpression Lysate

Fas/CD95 Background Information

CD95 (APO-1/Fas) is an important inducer of the extrinsic apoptosis signaling pathway and therapy induced apoptosis of many tumor cells has been linked to the activity of CD95. is a prototype death receptor characterized by the presence of an 8 amino acid death domain in its cytoplasmic tail. This domain is essential for the recruitment of a number of signaling components upon activation by either agonistic anti-CD95 antibodies or cognate CD95 ligand that initiate apoptosis. The complex of proteins that forms upon triggering of CD95 is called the death-inducting signaling complex (DISC). The DISC consists of an adaptor protein and initiator caspases and is essential for induction of apoptosis. CD95 is also crucial for the negative selection of B cells within the germinal center (GC). Impairment of CD95-mediated apoptosis results in defective affinity maturation and the persistence of autoreactive B-cell clones. Changes in the expression of CD95 and/or its ligand CD95L are frequently found in human cancer. The downregulation or mutation of CD95 has been proposed as a mechanism by which cancer cells avoid destruction by the immune system through reduced apoptosis sensitivity. Thus, CD95 has therefore been viewed as a tumor suppressor. CD95 has been reported to be involved in the activation of NF-kappaB, MAPK3/ERK1, MAPK8/JNK, and the alternate pathways for CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Accordingly, this protein is implicated in the pathogenesis of various malignancies and diseases of the immune system. The CD95/CD95L system was implicated in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) based, primarily, on the finding that CD95 is highly expressed in the intestinal epithelial cells and that epithelial apoptosis is increased in IBD.
Full Name
Fas cell surface death receptor
References
  • Mschen M, et al. (2002) The origin of CD95-gene mutations in B-cell lymphoma. Trends Immunol. 23(2): 75-80.
  • Peter ME, et al. (2003) The CD95(APO-1/Fas) DISC and beyond. Cell Death Differ. 10(1): 26-35.
  • Peter ME, et al. (2005) Does CD95 have tumor promoting activities Biochim Biophys Acta. 1755(1): 25-36.
  • Chen L, et al. (2010) Cell death in the colonic epithelium during inflammatory bowel diseases: CD95/Fas and beyond. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 16(6): 1071-6.
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