Human CNDP1 HEK293 Overexpression Lysate

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Human CNDP1 HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Product Information

Product Description
This Human CNDP1 overexpression lysate was created in HEK293 Cells and intented for use as a Western blot (WB) positive control. Purification of CNDP1 protein (Cat: 10077-H08H) from the overexpression lysate was verified.
Expression Host
HEK293 Cells
Species
Human
Sequence Information
A DNA sequence encoding the mature form of human CNDP1 (NP_116038.4) (Ser27-His507) was fused with a polyhistidine tag at the C-terminus.
Molecule Mass
The recombinant human CNDP1 consists of 492 amino acids and has a calculated molecular mass of 55.3 kDa. As a result of glycosylation, the protein migrates as an approximately 60-65 kDa band in SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions.

Human CNDP1 HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Usage Guide

Preparation Method
Cell lysate was prepared by homogenization of the over-expressed cells in ice-cold modified RIPA Lysis Buffer with cocktail of protease inhibitors (Sigma). Cell debris was removed by centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined by Bradford assay (Bio-Rad protein assay, Microplate Standard assay). The cell lysate was boiled for 5 min in 1 x SDS loading buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl pH 6.8, 12.5% glycerol, 1% sodium dodecylsulfate, 0.01% bromophenol blue) containing 5% b-mercaptoethanol, and lyophilized.
Lysis Buffer
Modified RIPA Lysis Buffer: 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 1mM EDTA, 1% Triton X-100, 0.1% SDS, 1% Sodium deoxycholate, 1mM PMSF.
Recommend Usage
1.  Centrifuge the tube for a few seconds and ensure the pellet at the bottom of the tube. 2.  Re-dissolve the pellet using 200μL pure water and boil for 2-5 min.
Sample Buffer
1 X Sample Buffer (1 X modified RIPA buffer+1 X SDS loading buffer).
Stability & Storage
Store at 4℃ for up to twelve months from date of receipt. After re-dissolution, aliquot and store at -80℃ for up to twelve months. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
Application
Western Blot (WB)
Optimal dilutions/concentrations should be determined by the end user.

Human CNDP1 HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Alternative Names

Human CN1 Overexpression Lysate; Human CPGL2 Overexpression Lysate; Human HsT2308 Overexpression Lysate

CNDP1 Background Information

CNDP1, also known as carnosine dipeptidase 1, glutamate carboxypeptidase-like protein 2 (CPGL-2) or carnosinase 1 (CN1), is a member of the M2 metalloprotease family. The CNDP1 gene contains trinucleotide (CTG) repeat length polymorphism in the coding region, which has been demonstrated to be associated with susceptibility to developing diabetic nephropathy, for carnosine protection against the adverse effects of high glucose levels on renal cells. In humans, CNDP1 is secreted from the liver into the serum. In other mammals, including rodents, CNDP1 is expressed exclusively within the kidney and lacks a signal peptide. CNDP1 protein is a secreted homodimeric dipeptidase that specifically hydrolyzes L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine), and is identified as human carnosinase expressed in the brain. CNDP1 has been associated with diabetic nephropathy in Europeans and European Americans, but not African-Americans. It was identified and confirmed as a risk factor, were cross-sectional and mostly in patients with type 2 diabetes. The polymorphisms of CNDP1 can be excluded as a risk factor for nephropathy in type 1 diabetes. In addition, CNDP1 is also suggested to be implicated in the actions of neuroprotection and neurotransmiting.
Full Name
carnosine dipeptidase 1 (metallopeptidase M20 family)
References
  • Teufel M, et al. (2003) Sequence identification and characterization of human carnosinase and a closely related non-specific dipeptidase. J Biol Chem 278(8):6521-31.
  • Janssen B, et al. (2005) Carnosine as a protective factor in diabetic nephropathy: association with a leucine repeat of the carnosinase gene CNDP1. Diabetes 54(8):2320-7.
  • Riedl E, et al. (2007) A CTG polymorphism in the CNDP1 gene determines the secretion of serum carnosinase in Cos-7 transfected cells. Diabetes 56(9):2410-3.
  • Freedman BI, et al. (2007) A leucine repeat in the carnosinase gene CNDP1 is associated with diabetic end-stage renal disease in European Americans. Nephrol Dial Transplant 22(4):1131-5.
  • Wanic K, et al. (2008) Exclusion of polymorphisms in carnosinase genes (CNDP1 and CNDP2) as a cause of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes: results of large case-control and follow-up studies. Diabetes 57(9):2547-51.
  • McDonough CW, et al. (2009) The influence of carnosinase gene polymorphisms on diabetic nephropathy risk in African-Americans. Hum Genet. 126(2):265-75.
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