Human C1 inhibitor HEK293 Overexpression Lysate

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Human C1 inhibitor HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Product Information

Product Description
This Human C1 inhibitor overexpression lysate was created in HEK293 Cells and intented for use as a Western blot (WB) positive control. Purification of C1 inhibitor protein (Cat: 10995-H08H) from the overexpression lysate was verified.
Expression Host
HEK293 Cells
Species
Human
Sequence Information
A DNA sequence encoding the human SERPING1 (NP_000053.2) precursor (Met 1-Ala 500) was expressed with a polyhistidine tag at the C-terminus.
Molecule Mass
The secreted recombinant human SERPING1 consists of 489 amino acids and predictes a molecular mass of 54.3 kDa. In SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions, it migrates with the apparent molecular mass of 110 kDa due to glycosylation.

Human C1 inhibitor HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Usage Guide

Preparation Method
Cell lysate was prepared by homogenization of the over-expressed cells in ice-cold modified RIPA Lysis Buffer with cocktail of protease inhibitors (Sigma). Cell debris was removed by centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined by Bradford assay (Bio-Rad protein assay, Microplate Standard assay). The cell lysate was boiled for 5 min in 1 x SDS loading buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl pH 6.8, 12.5% glycerol, 1% sodium dodecylsulfate, 0.01% bromophenol blue) containing 5% b-mercaptoethanol, and lyophilized.
Lysis Buffer
Modified RIPA Lysis Buffer: 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 1mM EDTA, 1% Triton X-100, 0.1% SDS, 1% Sodium deoxycholate, 1mM PMSF.
Recommend Usage
1.  Centrifuge the tube for a few seconds and ensure the pellet at the bottom of the tube. 2.  Re-dissolve the pellet using 200μL pure water and boil for 2-5 min.
Sample Buffer
1 X Sample Buffer (1 X modified RIPA buffer+1 X SDS loading buffer).
Stability & Storage
Store at 4℃ for up to twelve months from date of receipt. After re-dissolution, aliquot and store at -80℃ for up to twelve months. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
Application
Western Blot (WB)
Optimal dilutions/concentrations should be determined by the end user.

Human C1 inhibitor HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Alternative Names

Human C1IN Overexpression Lysate; Human C1INH Overexpression Lysate; Human C1NH Overexpression Lysate; Human HAE1 Overexpression Lysate; Human HAE2 Overexpression Lysate

C1 inhibitor Background Information

Plasma protease C1 inhibitor, also known as C1-inhibiting factor, C1-INH, C1 esterase inhibitor, SERPING1 and C1IN, is a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that regulates activation of both the complement and contact systems. By its C-terminal part (serpin domain), characterized by three beta-sheets and an exposed mobile reactive loop, C1-INH binds, and blocks the activity of its target proteases. The N-terminal end (nonserpin domain) confers to C1-INH the capacity to bind lipopolysaccharides and E-selectin. Owing to this moiety, C1-INH intervenes in regulation of the inflammatory reaction. The heterozygous deficiency of C1-INH results in hereditary angioedema (HAE). Owing to its ability to modulate the contact and complement systems and the convincing safety profile, plasma-derived C1 inhibitor is an attractive therapeutic protein to treat inflammatory diseases other than HAE. Deficiency of C1 inhibitor results in hereditary angioedema, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of localized angioedema of the skin, gastrointestinal mucosa or upper respiratory mucosa. C1 inhibitor may prove useful in a variety of other diseases including septic shock, reperfusion injury, hyperacute transplant rejection, traumatic and hemorrhagic shock, and the increased vascular permeability associated with thermal injury, interleukin-2 therapy and cardiopulmonary bypass.
Full Name
serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade G (C1 inhibitor), member 1
References
  • Davis AE 3rd. et al. (2004) Biological effects of C1 inhibitor. Drug News Perspect. 17(7): 439-46.
  • Cicardi M, et al. (2005) C1 inhibitor: molecular and clinical aspects. Springer Semin Immunopathol. 27(3): 286-98.
  • Wouters D, et al. (2008) C1 inhibitor: just a serine protease inhibitor? New and old considerations on therapeutic applications of C1 inhibitor. Expert Opin Biol Ther. 8(8): 1225-40.
  • Cugno M, et al. (2009) C1-inhibitor deficiency and angioedema: molecular mechanisms and clinical progress. Trends Mol Med. 15(2): 69-78.
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