Anti-C1 inhibitor Magnetic Beads Immunoprecipitation (IP) Kit

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Anti-C1 inhibitor Magnetic Beads-IP Kit Product Components

Components Storage
Anti-C1 inhibitor Magnetic Beads1,3 2-8℃ for 12 months
NP40 Cell Lysis Buffer2 -20℃ for 12 months
5×TBST(pH7.4)  
1×TBST(pH7.4)  
ddH2O  
Alkaline Elution Buffer 2-8℃ for 12 months
Acidity Elution Buffer 2-8℃ for 12 months
Neutralization Buffer 2-8℃ for 12 months

【1】The IP KIT contains anti-C1 inhibitor magnetic Beads (2 mg/mL) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) with sodium azide (0.1%).

【2】Using NP-40 cell lysate buffer in the kit is required,otherwise,the magnetic beads may be precipitated.

【3】Shipping: Magnetic Beads kits are shipped at ambient temperature in which magnetic beads are provided in liquid buffer.

Anti-C1 inhibitor Magnetic Beads-IP Kit Product Description

The Anti-C1 inhibitor magnetic Beads, conjugated with Anti-C1 inhibitor antibody, are used for immuneprecipitation (IP) of C1 inhibitor proteins which expressed in vitro expression systems. For IP, the beads are added to a sample containing C1 inhibitor proteins to form a bead-protein complex. The complex is removed from the solution manually using a magnetic separator. The bound C1 inhibitor proteins are dissociated from the magnetic beads using an elution buffer.

Anti-C1 inhibitor Magnetic Beads-IP Kit Antibody Information

Antibody
Anti-C1 inhibitor Antibody(10995-R018)
Immunogen
Recombinant Human SerpinG1 protein (Catalog#10995-H08H)
Species Reactivity
Human SerpinG1 / C1IN
Source
Monoclonal Human Rabbit IgG
Preparation
This antibody was obtained from a rabbit immunized with purified, recombinant Human SerpinG1 (rh SerpinG1; Catalog#10995-H08H; NP_000053.2; Met 1-Ala 500).
Applications
Immunoprecipitation (IP), Minimum Protein Purification

Anti-C1 inhibitor Magnetic Beads Immunoprecipitation (IP) Kit: Synonyms

Anti-C1INALCAM Magnetic Beads-Immunoprecipitatiopn (IP) Kit; Anti-C1INHALCAM Magnetic Beads-Immunoprecipitatiopn (IP) Kit; Anti-C1NHALCAM Magnetic Beads-Immunoprecipitatiopn (IP) Kit; Anti-HAE1ALCAM Magnetic Beads-Immunoprecipitatiopn (IP) Kit; Anti-HAE2ALCAM Magnetic Beads-Immunoprecipitatiopn (IP) Kit

C1 inhibitor Background Information

Plasma protease C1 inhibitor, also known as C1-inhibiting factor, C1-INH, C1 esterase inhibitor, SERPING1 and C1IN, is a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that regulates activation of both the complement and contact systems. By its C-terminal part (serpin domain), characterized by three beta-sheets and an exposed mobile reactive loop, C1-INH binds, and blocks the activity of its target proteases. The N-terminal end (nonserpin domain) confers to C1-INH the capacity to bind lipopolysaccharides and E-selectin. Owing to this moiety, C1-INH intervenes in regulation of the inflammatory reaction. The heterozygous deficiency of C1-INH results in hereditary angioedema (HAE). Owing to its ability to modulate the contact and complement systems and the convincing safety profile, plasma-derived C1 inhibitor is an attractive therapeutic protein to treat inflammatory diseases other than HAE. Deficiency of C1 inhibitor results in hereditary angioedema, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of localized angioedema of the skin, gastrointestinal mucosa or upper respiratory mucosa. C1 inhibitor may prove useful in a variety of other diseases including septic shock, reperfusion injury, hyperacute transplant rejection, traumatic and hemorrhagic shock, and the increased vascular permeability associated with thermal injury, interleukin-2 therapy and cardiopulmonary bypass.
Full Name
serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade G (C1 inhibitor), member 1
References
  • Davis AE 3rd. et al. (2004) Biological effects of C1 inhibitor. Drug News Perspect. 17(7): 439-46.
  • Cicardi M, et al. (2005) C1 inhibitor: molecular and clinical aspects. Springer Semin Immunopathol. 27(3): 286-98.
  • Wouters D, et al. (2008) C1 inhibitor: just a serine protease inhibitor? New and old considerations on therapeutic applications of C1 inhibitor. Expert Opin Biol Ther. 8(8): 1225-40.
  • Cugno M, et al. (2009) C1-inhibitor deficiency and angioedema: molecular mechanisms and clinical progress. Trends Mol Med. 15(2): 69-78.
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