Inhibin beta A/Activin A Proteins, Antibodies, cDNA Clones Research Reagents

INHBA (Inhibin Subunit Beta A, also known as EDF; FRP), located on 7p14.1, is conserved in chimpanzee, Rhesus monkey, dog, cow, mouse, rat, chicken, zebrafish, fruit fly, and frog. The gene produces a 47442 Da protein composed of 426 amino acids. This gene encodes a member of the TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta) superfamily of proteins. Diseases such as Ovary Adenocarcinoma and Sex Cord-Gonadal Stromal Tumor are associated with INHBA. The related pathways of INHBA include Signaling by GPCR and PEDF Induced Signaling.

Inhibin beta A/Activin A Protein (2)

Inhibin beta A/Activin A Antibody (3)

    Inhibin beta A/Activin A cDNA Clone (39)

    NM_002192.2
    NM_008380.1
    NM_017128.1

    Inhibin beta A/Activin A Lysate (2)

      Inhibin beta A/Activin A Background

      Activin and inhibin are two closely related protein complexes that have almost directly opposite biological effects. The activin and inhibin protein complexes are both dimeric in structure, and, in each complex, the two monomers are linked to one another by a single disulfide bond. Activin is composed of two β subunits, βA βA (activin A), βB βB (activin B), or βA βB (activin AB). Inhibin is composed of an alpha and one of two β subunits, βA (inhibin A) or βB (inhibin B). Activins are produced in many cell types and organs, such as gonads, pituitary gland, and placenta. In the ovarian follicle, activin increases FSH binding and FSH-induced aromatization. It participates in androgen synthesis enhancing LH action in the ovary and testis. In the male, activin enhances spermatogenesis. Also, Activin plays a role in wound repair and skin morphogenesis. Activin is strongly expressed in wounded skin, and overexpression of activin in the epidermis of transgenic mice improves wound healing and enhances scar formation. Activin also regulates the morphogenesis of branching organs such as the prostate, lung, and kidney. There is also evidence showed that lack of activin during development results in neural developmental defects.

      Inhibin beta A/Activin A References

      • Tanimoto K, et al. (1992) Structure and sequence analysis of the human activin beta A subunit gene. DNA Seq. 2 (2): 103-10.
      • Welt C, et al. (2002) Activins, inhibins, and follistatins: from endocrinology to signaling. A paradigm for the new millennium. Exp Biol Med. 227 (9): 724-52.
      • Xu J, et al. (1995) Inhibin antagonizes inhibition of liver cell growth by activin by a dominant-negative mechanism. J Biol Chem. 270 (11): 6308-13.

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