Mouse tPA HEK293 Overexpression Lysate

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Mouse tPA HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Product Information

Product Description
This Mouse tPA overexpression lysate was created in HEK293 Cells and intented for use as a Western blot (WB) positive control. Purification of tPA protein (Cat: 50910-M01H1) from the overexpression lysate was verified.
Expression Host
HEK293 Cells
Species
Mouse
Sequence Information
A DNA sequence encoding the mouse PLAT (P11214) (Ile309-Gln559) was was expressed with the fused Fc region of human IgG1 at the N-terminus.
Molecule Mass
The recombinant mouse PLAT/Fc comprises 511 amino acids and has a predicted molecular mass of 56.4 kDa. The apparent molecular mass of the protein is approximately 57 kDa in SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions due to glycosylation.

Mouse tPA HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Usage Guide

Preparation Method
Cell lysate was prepared by homogenization of the over-expressed cells in ice-cold modified RIPA Lysis Buffer with cocktail of protease inhibitors (Sigma). Cell debris was removed by centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined by Bradford assay (Bio-Rad protein assay, Microplate Standard assay). The cell lysate was boiled for 5 min in 1 x SDS loading buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl pH 6.8, 12.5% glycerol, 1% sodium dodecylsulfate, 0.01% bromophenol blue) containing 5% b-mercaptoethanol, and lyophilized.
Lysis Buffer
Modified RIPA Lysis Buffer: 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 1mM EDTA, 1% Triton X-100, 0.1% SDS, 1% Sodium deoxycholate, 1mM PMSF.
Recommend Usage
1.  Centrifuge the tube for a few seconds and ensure the pellet at the bottom of the tube. 2.  Re-dissolve the pellet using 200μL pure water and boil for 2-5 min.
Sample Buffer
1 X Sample Buffer (1 X modified RIPA buffer+1 X SDS loading buffer).
Stability & Storage
Store at 4℃ for up to twelve months from date of receipt. After re-dissolution, aliquot and store at -80℃ for up to twelve months. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
Application
Western Blot (WB)
Optimal dilutions/concentrations should be determined by the end user.

Mouse tPA HEK293 Overexpression Lysate: Alternative Names

Mouse AU020998 Overexpression Lysate; Mouse AW212668 Overexpression Lysate; Mouse D8Ertd2e Overexpression Lysate; Mouse tPA Overexpression Lysate

tPA Background Information

Tissue plasminogen activator (abbreviated tPA or PLAT), is traditionally viewed as a simple serine protease whose main function is to convert plasminogen into biologically active plasmin. As a protease, tPA plays a crucial role in regulating blood fibrinolysis, in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular matrix and in modulating the post-translational activation of growth factors. tPA is synthesized and secreted as a single chain polypeptide precursor which is cleaved in turn by plasmin. Proteolytic cleavage at the C-terminal side of Arg275 generates the enzyme composed of two subunits, designated as α and β chains which are held together by a single disulfide bond. Unlike the other members of the chymotrypsin family, tPA has one particular distinction in that the catalytic efficiency of the single-chain enzyme is only slightly lower than that of the proteolytically cleaved form and is therefore not a true zymogen. tPA is found not only in the blood, where its primary function is as a thrombolytic enzyme, but also in the central nervous system (CNS). It participats in a number of physiological and pathological events in the CNS, as well as the role of neuroserpin as the natural regulator of tPA's activity in these processes. Increased or decreased activity of tPA leads to hyperfibrinolysis or hypofibrinolysis, respectively. In addition, as a cytokine, tPA plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of renal interstitial fibrosis through diverse mechanisms. Thus, as a fibrogenic cytokine, it promotes the progression of kidney diseases.
Full Name
plasminogen activator, tissue
References
  • Yepes M, et al. (2004) New functions for an old enzyme: nonhemostatic roles for tissue-type plasminogen activator in the central nervous system. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 229(11): 1097-104.
  • Samson AL, et al. (2006) Tissue-type plasminogen activator: a multifaceted modulator of neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Neuron. 50(5): 673-8.
  • Skrzypiec AE, et al. (2008) Tissue plasminogen activator in the amygdala: a new role for an old protease. J Physiol Pharmacol. 59 Suppl 8: 135-46.
  • Hu K, et al. (2008) Novel actions of tissue-type plasminogen activator in chronic kidney disease. Front Biosci. 13: 5174-86.
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